Portfolio of Poetic Pastries

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Great Places Where Muse Has Danced The Waltz:

Home Furnishings, East Valley ChoraleSpoonflower, Demand Studios, Paperless Post, Mozilla, CowCow, Pier1, Country Door, Cafe Press, Hardmans, Uncommon Goods, Monet/Claiborne, Valley Express, Shutterstock, Iemporium, Neiman Marcus, White Iris Designs, MerckiStock, ArtFire, Zazzle, AMAEtsy, Vat19, CoverJunctionSerengeti, Markwood/Weimer, 4Vector, What On Earth, Nintendo, Ashton Woods, ThemeForest,  FXCoversNsuchAnimal Crossing, iMBC, Night-Helper, RagTags, TVKing Free Quotes and More, PhotoDune, Colourbox, LoveChequeCharge,   Windy Ridge Estates, AboutEducation, Funimation, WikiHow, TrendyPaperCovers, Creative Market, JotForm, iphone6wallpapers, VanMeterInc.  Bromance Heaven’s Garden Pixabay,  Giphy,  Panda and Hedgehog,

Released Paperback Books as The Muse:

Released Audio Books as The Muse:

Released Kindle Books as The Muse:

Released iTunes Books as The Muse:

Released Songs as The Muse:

Released Ringtones:

Released Videos as The Muse:

Articles of Design as The Muse:

  • “Savvy Seven” (Masterful Spaces Corp. Clients’ Design Packets) pro bono publico
  • “Seeing Green” (Rhodec Perspective) pro bono publico
  • “Historical Interior Design Synopsis Study” (Columbia) pro bono publico
  • “My Design Doc Advice Column” (News~Tribune AP Subscriber) pro bono publico
  • “Storage Secrets For Santa” (News~Tribune AP Subscriber) pro bono publico
  • “Designing for Two” (News~Tribune AP Subscriber) pro bono publico
  • “Rainbow of Color” (News~Tribune AP Subscriber) pro bono publico
  • “The Color Saga Continues” (News~Tribune AP Subscriber) pro bono publico
  • “Ergonomics, A Muse’s Perspective” (online magazine 8-9) pro bono publico
  • “Home Decor Haven” (online magazine pg 14) pro bono publico

Random Samples of Technical Manuals:

  • “Reviewing the Writing of Others” (USPDOD)
  • “Effective Written Communication” (USPDOD)
  • “Writing for Technical Attributes” (USPDOD)
  • “Staffing and Research Studies” (USPDOD)
  • “GTE Residency Program” (GTE SYS CORP)
  • “Accounting Foundations” (Century 21 Accounting)
  • “Foundations of Recruitment” (NV~THS)
  • “Historical Records” (USPDOD)
  • “Methods of Instruction” (USPDOD)
  • “Laboratory Mathematics” (USPDOD)
  • “Law of War” (USPDOD)
  • “Feature Writing and Editorials” (USPDOD)
  • “Foundation Journalism” (USPDOD)
  • “Community Public Affairs” (USPDOD)
  • “Electrical Mathematics” (USPDOD)
  • “Digital Security” (USPDOD)
  • “Software Concepts” (USPDOD)
  • “Cartography~Series” (USPDOD)
  • “AC Theory Sine Waves” (USPDOD)
  • “Remote Terminal Access Security” (USPDOD)
  • “Search and Recovery Foundational Aspects” (USPDOD)
  • “T~O Threat/Response” (USPDOD)

Random Samples of Art and Web Application Pro Bono Publico:

Personal Notes:
I Am A
* Voracious Collector
* Spontaneous Traveler
* Vintage Fanatic
* Spirited Soothsayer
* Fanciful Ponder(er)
* Soulful Quill
* Loyal Friend
* Devoted Heart

Business Notes:
I Am A(n)

* Product Developer and Design Stylist
* Professional Lyricist
* Greeting/Inspirational/Humorous & Holiday Card Writer
* Prose/Vows/Taglines & Jingles Composer
* Author Enigmatic Evolution, Prose of Heart and Soul
* Author Anthesis, A Capella of Love Sonnets
* Author The Little Sprout, A Tender Children’s Tale
* Director and Writer of Autumn Wind King Video
* Producer, Director and Writer of Orion’s Belt Video
* A variety of work doing this and that under various non de plumes
* Creator of over 10k internet free/shareware graphics

What I Am Not:
* Humorless
* Fickle
* Unfaithful
* Haughty
* Insensitive
* Spiritless
* Purfect

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Homage to the Maiden ~ Dunne ~ Dunn ~ O’ Duinn

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Family Lineage: I want to pay homage to my family from another time…to my maternal grandmother’s lineage from Mathenay France…a quaint country village nestled in the eastern region, whose ancestors served in knighthood, whose female ancestors fought along side in battle, to those brave young women that were shipped to ‘New France” ~ to my grandfather whose line reaches to Charles the Hammer, a great military leader and grandfather of Charlemagne ~

to my paternal line of Ó Duinn of Ireland, whose family war cry and motto “mullach abú” (people of the hill forever), resonates in my soul  and whose line holds tether to Gillananaomh Ó Duinn, historian and poet ~ my paternal grandmother whose lines follow Niall, the Daohertys, Dohertys (sept/clan) are one of Europe’s longest descent lines ~ for the Buckners of Prussia who helped forge an empire ~

to a “laughing maiden’, Eahawea, an American Indian of the Sioux tribe that gave herself to a Scottish frontiersman, named Ian, during the years of Col Custer ~ to tender hearts that left their native land to forge this country ~ to souls who fought and loved, in good times and in bad  ~ to those of my husband’s line, from England, Germany and Holland, cartographers, farmers, frontiersmen, military soldiers / sailors and explorers ~

In honor of each and every ‘memory’ that was scratched upon a rock, drawn in the sand, etched in stone, quilled upon parchment, or penned by hand…to all, I offer poetic sweetness in your wake ~ (muse)

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Surname ~ Van Meter ~ Van Meteren ~ Van Metre

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The first mention of a Van Meteren, (also called Van Meteren or Van Meter or Van Metre) we can trace is in a deed dated September 1253. “Meeteren”, is a village in the Tielerwaard and the village of Meteren is still shown on the current maps of Holland.

One of the branches of the family lived in the “Huise Van Meteren” in Geldermalsen.There is but little available concerning the residences of the Van Meterens in Holland; one sketch, however, has been obtained which refers to the “Huise Van Meteren” situate in the Heerlykleid Metere, in Geldermelsen. It was reported to be a stately structure. The home, for many years and generations, of one the branches of the Van Metre family, and subsequently of others. This mansion stood in a beautiful park of magnificent trees, some of which were of great height and dimensions. The house was rebuilt in 1768-9, but it has at last served its day; it was sold in December, 1906, and, has since been torn down.

Coat-of-Arms: Our family’s coat of arms the Van Meteren is divided into four equal parts. Two quarters diagonal of each other with horizontal stripes of red and yellow. On the yellow stripes we find eight martlets (or swallows), three on the top stripe, two in the middle and three at the bottom stripe. The two other quarters are azure with in the centre a red fleur de lis (the royal emblem of France). The title here, “jr.,” is synonymous with Jonkvrouw, young woman, feminine, and Jonkheer, young man, masculine. “Ridderschap” and “Ridderedd” signifies either Nobility or Knighthood. As both men and women of this line fought valiantly for France and Christendom. The coat of arms of the village Meteren is azure with in the center a golden fleur de lis. The coat of arms of the village Cuijk has horizontal stripes of red and yellow. On the yellow stripes we find eight martlets, three on the top stripe, two in the middle and three at the bottom stripe. The coat of arms of the van Meteren/van Meeteren/Van Metre/Van Matre family is composed out of the coat of arms of the village of Meteren and of the village Cuijk, representing the ties of the two families and villages dated in the 1300-1400’s.

The branch of the VanMeteren family with whom we are direct descendants, came to America in 1662, as revealed in the papers of the ship “Vos” (Fox), arriving at New Amsterdam. The Van Meterens were of Holland/Dutch lineage, and a new spelling of the name came upon them as they reached New Amsterdam and subsequently moved into New Jersey, VanMeter is first seen. In the third generation of the family was John VanMeter, who commanded a trading expedition into the wilds of Virginia and four of his sons subsequently settled in the mountain districts of old Virginia (WV).

The VanMeters had previously secured their conditional grants by orders of the governor and council, dated June 17, 1730. The John VanMeter grant, located in the VA (WV) valley, enjoined the settlement of ten families. Broadly interpreted, the territory was a vast tract of uncharted wilderness–exceeding 40,000 acres.

John’s son Isaac VanMeter with his wife and four children settled at historic Fort Pleasant in what is now Hardy County, West Virginia, in 1744. Isaac Van Meter, brother of Jacob, was killed and scalped by the Indians near his fort in 1757. One of his sons was Colonel Garret Van Meter who was born in New York in February 1732, and was a boy of twelve when the family located at Fort Pleasant. In 1756 he married Mrs. Ann Markee Sibley, and after the death of his father, inherited Mount Pleasant and a large tract of surrounding land. This land grant was issued by Lord Fairfax, from King George in 1761. (This original land grant document is currently in the Muse’s family’s possession today). He was a colonel of a regiment of militia in General Washington’s army in the Revolution. After the war he and his wife lived at old Fort Pleasant, where they stayed until death.

Only two of their sons grew to mature years, Isaac, born in 1757 and Jacob, born May 18, 1764. These brothers married sisters, Bettie and Tabitha Inskeep, whose mother was Hannah McCulock (McCulloch), a daughter of the most famous Indian fighter and scout of his day. Jacob Van Meter, the younger son of Colonel Garrett Van Meter, inherited the Fort Pleasant homestead, where he and his wife, Tabitha, spent their lives. He was colonel of a regiment in the second war with Great Britain in 1812. He became a flour miller in the South Branch Valley and for many years was a partner of Chief Justice Marshall in the breeding of thoroughbred horses.

Utilizing the land of heritage, family owned for 287 years (as of 2017); the direct descendants of the original VanMeters/VanMetres/VanMeterens/VanMeeterens of today are still residing and working in Hardy County WV. The Muse’s family calls the land Windy Ridge Farm and the cottage home has been named The Painted Nest. The farm houses a state of the art poultry operation,  pasture and crop land, as well as acres of undisturbed woodland.

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Pondering Pansies ~ What’s in a Name?

Romantic oil painting with chocolate, books, quill and sunflowers
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My name is derived from my Nanny (grandmother) who, (the story goes) on Easter Sunday, was born dead. It is told that her father, my great-grandfather, had a little bouquet of ‘pansy’ flowers in his hands he had picked from the garden, expecting this day to be joyous. Upon hearing this grievous news, he sullenly laid the tiny bouquet atop his daughter’s tiny chest. The moment the flowers touched her…she gasped for air and began to wail.  She was promptly named ‘Pansy’ (to think/to ponder).  Along with that mantle, my father added “Lee”. This name, means shelter in the storm. ‘Pansylee’ ~ (muse)

‘Pansies’, as a flower are quite remarkable. Did you know the entirety of the flower is edible? It is true, sepals and all (stem to stern). Bakers, candy makers and chefs are quite fond of using ‘pansies’, which offer a culinary paradox: being both muted and minty in flavor.The petulant language of flowers is remarkably traditional in nature rather than scientific. The wives’ tales, the historical and religious overtones of flowers abound in every society and culture. Here are few;

Victorians ~ A honeyflower and a ‘pansy’ left by a lover for his beloved means “I am thinking of our forbidden love”, (I shall discreetly note here that the honeyflower is a erect bushy shrub of eastern Australia, whose flowers produce copious amounts of nectar. This plant was grown in hothouses/conservatories/arboretums in the Victorian age with…vigor)

The name “pansy” is derived from the French word pensée, “thought”, and was imported into Late Middle English as a name of Viola in the mid-15th century, as the flower was regarded as a symbol of remembrance. The name “love in idleness” was meant to imply the image of a lover who has little or no other employment than to think of her beloved.

The name “heart’s-ease” came from St. Euphrasia, whose name in Greek signifies cheerfulness of mind. The woman, who refused marriage and took the veil, was considered a pattern of humility, hence the name “humble violet”.McGlashan, James. The Dublin University Magazine: A Literary and Political Journal. Vol. 42. July to December 1853: 286.

Writer James Shirley Hibberd wrote that the French custom of giving a bride a bouquet of ‘pansies’ (ponderings/thoughts) and marigolds (cares) symbolized the woes of domestic life rather than marital bliss, in 1858. I disagree. I believe the flower combination was meant to signify the endurance of matrimonial bliss, by ushering in a unified gentle thought or gentle caring of the bride to groom and vice versa. For shame on Mr Hibberd for being so pessimistic ~ (I also want to note that this bouquet combination is also ‘edible’…and dates back to 15th century. Perhaps something very important in early centuries, where sustenance was difficult to obtain).

The French and English were not the only ones to acknowledge the beauty and power of the ‘pansy’.  An old German fable spins the yarn of how the ‘pansy’ lost its aromatic perfume. The story advises us that once upon a time, ‘pansies’ were indeed very fragrant. Abundantly growing wild in fields and forests, they permeated the countryside with sweetness. Such was the desire to obtain the botanical cologne, the German people would trample the tender green grass in eagerness to pick pansies. Overtime, the grass turned brown and could not withstand the barrage. In turn, the cows of Germany began to starve. The ‘pansies’ in their soft repose and gentle thought, prayed to the heavens, to take away their sweet perfume. The powers granted this prayer. And the people of the land, no longer lured to the velvet potpourri, made no vast treks wherein the grass was trampled to oblivion. This selfless act allowed the cattle to once more find the tender green shoots, to grow fat and keep the Germanic peoples alive and blessed bountifully.

Even the American pioneers did not escape the rituals of flower usage. A handful of ‘pansies’ taken indoors at early spring was believed to have ensured the farm’s prosperity.  Could it be that known for their tenacity to endure frost and snows, the ‘pansies’ gave these struggling frontiersmen hope of the new spring? We can only guess. It has also been recorded that American settler children, as well as American Indian youngsters, saw faces within the flowers and constructed tiny bands of ‘pansy’ dolls (precursors to GI Joe and Barbie), old sketches show these primitive toys, formed with leaves, twigs and vines. Seeking to create beauty for themselves (as well as their male companions) the ingenuity of the femme sex in this new land, utilized the blessed bounty of their surroundings. Nature became their shopping plaza. Adornments of flowers, pine cones, shells and more are recorded as early Americana patisserie. ‘Pansies’ were pinned, poked, sewn to almost every facet of adult feminine clothing (these floral trims could last several days ~ more than long enough, I would suspect for any frontierswoman of the time…)

In literature, the ‘pansy’ has played starring roles. William Shakespeare’s work,  A Midsummer Night’s Dream, offers the juice of the heart’s ease (the old Britannia term for ‘pansy’) as a love potion. “on sleeping eyelids laid, will make a man or woman madly dote upon the next live creature that it sees.” Shakespeare continued to add ‘pansies’ into his creations. The tale of Hamlet has Ophelia distributing ‘pansies’ ~ “There’s pansies, that’s for thoughts” (writers and poets seem to be drawn to the pondering face of the velvet botanical maiden….).

Many poets through the years, have placed the diminutive flower within their lines;  Edmund Spenser (c. 1552 -13 January 1599 author of The Faerie Queene),  Michael Drayton (c. 1563 – December 23, 1631),  Ben Jonson (c. 11 June 1572 – 6 August 1637), William Wordsworth (7 April 1770 – 23 April 1850 famous for launching the ‘Romantic Age’ of poetic literature), Bernard Barton (c. 1784 – 1849 The Quaker Poet),  William Wakefield (c. 1801 – 19 September 1848), and  J. J. Grandville (1803-1847 Pensée from Fleurs Animées).

The epic qualities of the botanical ‘pansy’ have and continue to be intertwined with its deeper meaning. This ponderous nature entices not only poets. It was Nathaniel Hawthorne, American novelist, who left us contemplating his unfinished creation, aptly named “Pansie, a Fragment”(1864) whose story has a character of kindness and thoughtfulness, a young child…aptly named.

No topic of the word ‘pansy’ would be complete without paying tribute to the renown authoress Margaret Mitchell. She originally chose the name ‘Pansy’ O’Hara as the name for her Gone with the Wind heroine, but, historical documents show she was prompted by her publicist to make changes. He also urged her to seek another name for the homestead of her heroine. Ms Mitchell succumbed to both requests. The plantation’s name, was originally called ‘Fontenoy’ (it should be noted both ‘Pansy’ O’Hara and ‘Fontenoy’ have ties to French and Irish terminology). It has long been my personal opinion, that Ms Mitchell saw her heroine as a thinker, a planner, a ponderer, (and who today can deny that ‘Scarlett O’Hara was indeed that?) thus, the name ‘Pansy’ seemed quite appropriate. Of course, O’Hara is quintessentially Irish.  This French application of the name ‘Pansy’ also falls in line with the use of the name ‘Fontenoy’ for the plantation. Fontenoy is the location of the epic battle where the French, aided by Irish foot soldiers, defeated the British regiments in 1745.  Deciding upon ‘Tara’ as the final name for the plantation, directly refers to a village in eastern Ireland, northwest of Dublin. Tara was the seat of Irish kings from ancient times until the sixth century. Quite appropriate for the spectacular O’Hara home of the epic novel.

This woven fabric of Irish and French lineage names, continued, even though Ms Mitchell made changes.  I can picture the publicist reading her work and lamenting that this strong willed, shrewd, and powerful heroine was being called ‘Pansy’…his mind, I daresay conjured up rows of flowery, velveteen faces, buttery soft and  erroneously weak. For him this character was not pensive, or thoughtful. He must have seen her only as fire and brimstone, a true stereo-typical Irish lass, who could only be named for the red sparks she threw about… ‘Scarlett’, (old French origin meaning “red”). It is important to remember that ‘Scarlett’ and ‘Pansy’ are the same. They represent, in name, the characteristics of one individual. I am her, she is me, we are one … the Muse and I. She is a paradox – she is all and she is null. She is that part of me that exists to create and explore. Her artistic and literary entreats whisper to me; pondering pansies among the stars.

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Pansylee VanMeteren – Artist’s Bio

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Note: these kind words below were penned by Earl M. Coleman

(poetic friend and mentor-1916-2009-you are truly missed)

Biography for Muse, Pansylee VanMeteren of Poetic Pastries ~ WV poet, lyricist, author and artist, who creates under the nom de plume, The Muse (Muse), daughter of a deceased American naval officer, she currently resides in the South Branch Valley of WV United States.

Early in her career, Muse engaged her skills for technical purposes, such as document translation and schematic visualizations for government entities. She continued to write and paint poetically, in secret, using her pen name, Muse. An inner compass is evident in her work. Pieces reflect both past and present dilemmas; while showcasing her victories in overcoming these obstacles ~ all from her faith based perspective. Light touches of modernism play hand in hand with old world strokes, offering highly visceral readings. In 2010, a genesis compilation of Muse, Enigmatic Evolution, gave rise to her poetic voice.

Muse’s creations are predominately lyrical often resulting in poetic sonnets and fairytale like art. Lengths of work vary from simple and compact poetry to elaborately complex pieces. Thematically her writing pattern engages an autobiographical subtext. Structurally the Muse’s works involve a blend of poetry and prose. Elegantly fluid sentence formation creates an often old world environment. Highly figurative language is used extensively throughout her work. The paintings and drawings of Muse waltz hand in hand with her own words. The children’s story ~ The Little Sprout, offers up a prime sample of this blending.

A paradox of a woman, her hands are calloused and reverent. They have painted canvases, molded clay, charted geo-spatial trajectories, engineered software, washed puppies, and scrubbed floors. They have wiped away tears and folded in prayer. They have fired missiles and cradled babies. She is known to be gaming wordsmith offering her readers in social media brain teasers and poetic ponderings. The Muse proudly claims a kaleidoscopic ancestry of Irish, English, Scottish, French, German and American Indian. Since her youth, she has been fluent in several languages. An avid bibliophile and logophile, The Muse continues her passion by immersing herself in the written word of various genres. She adores word games especially Scrabble.

A self proclaimed lover of life, The Muse, celebrates by inspiring those around her. She is married to her first love; is a mother, and a nanny (grand-mother). The Muse resides with her family on an American Heritage Farm, which has been in their family for over 200 years. Her poetic and artistic ingenuity flows from the inspirational South Branch Valley of WV.

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So WHO is Muse?

Muse of Poetic Pastries

I am a vintage creation enjoying the winter of my life (some might call me old … although I prefer to say ‘seasoned’).  My friends call me Muse.  Like the mythological muses, my interests are varied; each day becomes an opportunity to greet life with gusto!  The style of Poetic Pastries cannot be pegged exactly ~ most people have come to call it simply Musey-ness ~ a term I welcome warmly.  This website has been created to spread a little artistic, confectionery joy to others; my quill and brush thank you for visiting ~ Pansylee VanMeteren (aka: Muse)

My work consists of designs licensed to international manufacturing companies and are available as print on demand art with a myriad of product options. Illustration, design, as well as poetry, become ingredients in my imaginative kitchen.  Specializing in creating graphics for unique gifts, home decor, holiday accessories, greeting cards and apparel, Poetic Pastries is a visionary bakery offering ‘Sweet Treats for Mind and Soul’.

Design and Illustration Services of Poetic Pastries

As a military veteran, I embrace ‘art therapy’ for wounded warriors; offering workshops for my fellow brothers and sisters who wore the uniform.  Classes are held through online forums and in conjunction with nationally recognized groups; DAV (Disabled American Veterans), WWP (Wounded Warrior Project) and the VA (United States Veteran’s Administration).

Each review the Studio receives presents an opportunity for growth, along with a chance to build a connection of trust. Over the years, Poetic Pastries clientele have become more than simply “repeat customers” ~ a tether has developed, friendships have bloomed.  Loyalty of brand, enchantment of style and an expectation of being whimsically nourished through the many designs and illustrations of Muse are all measures of what the Studio calls ‘Success Souffle’.

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