~ The Many Styles of Marie Antoinette ~

Antoinette by Muse of Poetic Pastries

HAIR: The XVIII century fashion became very sophisticated and voluminous 3D hairstyles were common at Royal Court.   Queen Marie-Antoinette played very important role in development of the new and gregarious hairstyles. Her vision with the aide of hairstylist Leonard Kuaferom, created some amazing masterpieces called “Sensitivity Explosion”, “Voluptuous”, “Secret Passion”. These highly evocative, blatantly romantic and sensual names further pushed the envelope of French court decadence.

Historical records note that making just one single wig for Queen Marie Antoinette took between one to ten hours of constant labor. Upon completion and use, the hair was not washed at all for months and was only combed with specially made tool resembling a metal hand. Why? Because of the sheer intrinsically exhausting time it took to create the coif. And to make matters worse, these behemoth concoctions were regularly greased with raw pork lard. Any woman sporting these oh so trendy “dos” would have had the added height of 3 feet upon their head. The weight varied as well since they selected a menagerie of tangibles to be woven into the deigns. The court often hosted themed galas. No well stationed woman dared not attempt to please and fascinate her peers.

Marie Antoinette Hairstyles

Day to day activities were highly curtailed, movement kept for only the important tasks, receiving other visiting royals or social equals, partaking of tea and dancing. As one can imagine nighttime activities were no less stressful – sleeping normally was out of the question. Specially designed cushions and sleeping chairs were quite common. Armor of sorts was placed on the coiffed heads to protect the hair design’s integrity as well keeping out mice! (perhaps this is where the term “hair looks like a rat’s nest” first originated?)  Due to the unusual shapes being requested (as each woman at court tried desperately to out coif the other), customized haberdashery excelled to a new level of artistry.  These grandiose displays of excess gave birth to countless XVIII century cartoons and mockeries. Sadly Marie Antoinette represents the first victim of a fashion faux pas. Never flaunt all your assets. One never knows the ultimate cost – for poor Marie, it was her head.

Pansylee VanMeteren Illustrator, Author, Poet, Songwriter Lyricst, Artist of WV - The Muse - Poetic Pastries - Antoinette by Muse of Poetic Pastries

HISTORICAL SIGNIFICANCE:  Maria Antonia Josepha Johanna von Habsburg-Lothringen (2 November 1755 – 16 October 1793), an Archduchess of Austria, was the fifteenth and penultimate child of Francis I, Holy Roman Emperor and Empress Maria Theresa.  In April 1770, upon her marriage (at the age of 14 years and 5 months) to Louis-Auguste, heir to the throne of France, she became Dauphine of France. On 10 May 1774, when her husband ascended the throne as Louis XVI, upon the death of his grandfather Louis XV, she became Queen of France and Navarre, title she held until September 1791, when, at that time of the French Revolution, she became Queen of the French, a title she held until 21 September 1792.

Pansylee VanMeteren Illustrator, Author, Poet, Songwriter Lyricst, Artist of WV - The Muse - Poetic Pastries - ©™Anthesis by Muse

During the Revolution, after the government had placed the royal family under house arrest in the Tuileries Palace in October 1789, several events linked to Marie Antoinette, in particular the June 1791 attempt to flee, and her role in the War of the First Coalition, had disastrous effects on French popular opinion. On 10 August 1792, the attack on the Tuileries forced the royal family to take refuge at the Assembly, and on 13 August the family was imprisoned in the Temple. On 21 September 1792, the monarchy was abolished. After a two-day trial begun on 14 October 1793, Marie Antoinette was convicted by the Revolutionary Tribunal of high treason, and executed by guillotine on Place de la Révolution (today place de la Concorde) on 16 October 1793.

Want More Romance? Check out Muse’s romantic art or books of poetry below ~

Art of Allure and Romance

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 Historical Art Imagery Follows (full size renderings)

Marie Antoinette Historical Art PaintingCartoon of AntoinetteMarie Antoinette Historical CartoonMarie Antoinette Historical CartoonMarie Antoinette Historical CartoonMarie Antoinette Historical CartoonMarie Antoinette Historical CartoonMarie Antoinette Historical CartoonMarie Antoinette Historical Cartoon

Characters of Muse - Iris and Gertie
~ Sisters of the Heart ~

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~ Stocking Trivia – Muse Mania Menagerie ~

1900a

How much do you know about socks? Stockings?

Here are some facts: (which will come in handy, sometime/somewhere and could possibly save your life)

  1. In ancient times the stockings and socks were made of leather, or animal hair/matted fur.
  2. it was not until the 16th century that fabric stockings were manufactured.
  3. socks and stockings were handmade primarily up to the 1800s
  4. The modern English word sock is derived from the Old English word socc, meaning “light slipper”.
  5. The Children’s Society produced the largest Christmas stocking made in December 2007, and measured 32.56 meters (106 feet and 10 inches) in height and 14.97 feet (49 feet 1 inch) in width, and contained 1000 presents.
  6. Original Christmas stockings were use-able and never intended to be solely for display.
  7. During the late 19th and early 20th centuries stockings often featured elaborate designs, patterns and embroidery on the feet and calves was common. Red stockings were oh so very popular. (tres chic)
  8. Sock production was sent reeling on its heels with the invention of nylon in 1938.
  9. During the time of 1940’s, the war effort had a direct impact on nylon stocking manufacturing, giving rise to The Nylon Riots.
  10. Four million pairs of stockings bought in one day (1939).
  11. DUPONT engineered the first pair of women’s nylons as we know them today.

So there you are, a list of brain sweets Prototype Baby Teethers - TM - Pansylee VanMeteren Illustrator, Author, Poet, Songwriter Lyricst, Artist of WV - The Muse - Poetic Pastries
And to make the day complete, here are the words to an old song, celebrating NYLONS :)

Gone are the days when I’d answer the bell
Find a salesmen with stockings to sell
Gleam in his eye and measuring tape in his hand
I get the urge to go splurging on hose
Nylons a dozen of those
Now poor or rich we’re enduring instead
Woolens which itch
Rayons that spread

I’ll be happy when the nylons bloom again
Cotton is monotonous to men
Only way to keep affection fresh
Get some mesh for your flesh
I’ll be happy when the nylons bloom again
Ain’t no need to blow no sirens then

When the frozen hosen can appear
Man that means all clear

Working women of the USA and Britain
Humble dowager or lowly debutant
We’ll be happy as puppy or a kitten
Stepping back into their nylons of DuPont

Keep on smiling to the nylons bloom again
And the WACS come back to join their men
In a world that Mr. Wallace planned
Strolling hand in hand

— George Marion, Jr. and Fats Waller, When the Nylons Bloom Again

 

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~ Tears Poem Quote from Muse ~

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“I would write my tears, weeping out my pain

I would empty my veins for ink.” (muse slice)

Logophile Pastry:

The word ‘would’ is considered  to be a verb in the English language. Verbs are those words which directly relate to action. ‘Would’, can infer that you have already willing done something, becoming the past tense. It should be noted that in today’s style of speech and writing,  we rarely see this application. More often we utilize the word have. ie. I will do that < > I have done that. We use the word ‘would’ in a more futuristic sense … I would do that.

But the word ‘will’ also implies an action yet to be taken also. ie. I will eat the apple. Since all of the issues discussed are true, what difference does it make when a poet (or writer) decides upon a certain connotation or meaning ?  It means the world!

Let’s try these examples;

  1. I would write my tears, weeping out my pain ~I would empty my veins for ink.
  2. I will write my tears, weeping out my pain ~I will empty my veins for ink.
  3. I have written my tears, weeping out my pain ~I have emptied my veins for ink.

Number 3, it is quite clear that this action has already occurred. Something has caused our writer grief and pain. As readers we immediately begin to ‘relate’. Our inquisitive human nature is put on hold because we have no further insight from the author. We search our souls for empathy and/or sympathy. For who among us have not shed tears? It is only on a commitment to deeper exploration we seek to know what caused these actions. Yet not every reader is a committed reader ~ not every reader is an explorer. As a writer, you most assuredly want to evoke empathy and sympathy but as a good writer and poet you want more!

Number 2, utilizes the word ‘will’.  A statement that infers the writer is determined and steadfast in their commitment to action. The reader feels a less compelling connection to the poet, why? Because the poet is not engaging the reader. By choosing to use the word ‘will’,  we are being prepared for little else than a monologue. As a writer / poet one must use care not lose their reader. For now we are asking “ok, so, you will…now what?” … If there is not a clear and definitive path to emotion stronger than that ~ all is for naught.

‘Would’. My chosen word. Why? Because it states the action … with a delicately nuanced set of conditions. “I would write my tears…” leaves the reader to ask “You would, why? Have you? When?” etc.  This selection also entangles the heart and mind for the same reasons cited in number 3.  By choosing the word “would”, the poet / writer weaves a decidedly more layered thread with the reader. The reader, who may not on the surface be an explorer, will react to the word ‘would’ with emotional and mental ferocity. “Right, I would do that too…IF…”  Therein dwells the secret. You must find a spark of camaraderie between poet / writer and reader.

The word ‘would’ is such a powerful weapon, use it with caution as tears may follow.

Pansylee VanMeteren Illustrator, Author, Poet, Songwriter Lyricst, Artist of WV - The Muse - Poetic Pastries

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~ Love – Gluttony ~

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“I ache not from need –
but from my heart’s gluttony of you.” (muse slice)

Logophile Pastry:

Gluttony is our modernized English version taken from an old Latin word ‘gluttire’. Precisely  it describes the act of gulping down or swallowing with greed or excessive indulgence. The emotional attachment to the word gluttony immediately gives our brain visions of vulgarity, waste, indiscretion, extravagance, bloat, vile and in some cases, sinfulness.

One of the first recorded uses of the term comes to us from the Biblical book of Leviticus (and Deuteronomy) 538–332 BCE. The reference point deals directly with food/wine etc. excess above and beyond what is required to exist. So, in effect we have been imprinted with images of massive bodies, slothfully gorging at a never ending banquet. This mental picture rightfully gives us pause. We innately know that this behavior is detrimental to our well being.

Let us then ask the question, can there be true gluttony of something which is entirely good? Can we be gluttonous with the air we breathe, if we breathe deeply? Are we treading into ravenous oceans if we consume more than the daily recommended allowance of water? And what of love? Can we love in a manner, so all consuming it becomes a loathsome cardiac entanglement? Sadly the answer is yes to all of the above. When these basics become addictions, such once beautiful things as love become an affliction.

In all good things show temperance.

In this slice of Muse poetry, I have offered up the term in a more ‘palatable’ fashion (hopefully).

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